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memorizing

Devotion, Growing Up

Updated Latin-English Primer, John 1:1-7 (CC Cycle 3)

This entry is part 14 of 14 in the series Classsical Conversations

Over the past four years of homeschooling my kids, I have grown to understand just how difficult the job of those one-room schoolhouse teachers was. Though we have settled into our homeschool routines, there are many interruptions, many adjustments, many opportunities for growth. There are days when I choose to take the long view of our children’s education, rather than checking all the boxes.

I take a deep breath (or a fresh cup of coffee) and remind myself we have a LOT of days in which to educate and train our little ones.  I also remind myself that the older two, for better or worse, are test cases.  Hopefully, I have much more figured out once the younger two are walking through the stages we are going through today with the older.  I think: “We can make mistakes.  We can take breaks.  We will have another chance to do these things.”

The concept of the one-room schoolhouse must, as a necessity, be a reality in our home.  This year we are homeschooling a 4th grader and a 2nd/3rd-grader, introducing a pre-K/K mash-up student. while trying to keep a busy and quick learning 3-year-old occupied.  It’s a lot. The idea of separating these kids and their learning into completely different boxes is just not feasible.

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Growing Up

Simple Shakespeare for Kids

This entry is part 7 of 24 in the series Homeschool

Intimidating. That is the one word that describes teaching Shakespeare to kids. At least for me. The language…the rhythm…the adult subject matter. “How in the world can we even approach this?” I asked myself this question a lot before I started teaching Shakespeare.

Encouraged by a podcast I listened to a few years ago, I knew it was a possibility. And I knew I would love to share Shakespeare with my kids. I shook off the intimidation and the insecurities and did as we have always done on this homeschooling journey: we simply jumped in.

The waters, it turned out, were just fine.

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